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October 07, 2016

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Bernard & Mathieu Baudry

 

Bernard and Matthieu Baudry
 
 

Bernard Baudry and son Matthieu are making some of the best wines in Chinon these days from the best terroirs in the appellation in Cravant-les-Coteaux. That's saying something considering that they didn't even own vines 40 years ago. In fact, along with Raffault, these are pretty clearly the best two sources of Chinon in my mind. Where Raffaults wines tend to be powerful, brooding and very slow to evolve, Baudry's Chinons are made in a slightly more approachable style though not at the expense of structure or integrity. This is more like comparing Latour to Lafite than anything else.

Farming here has been fully organic since 2006, not easy to do in this continental climate with it's humidity and otherwise unpredictable weather. The domaine consists of various parcels planted on diverse soils around Cravant from pure limestone at the top of the slope facing the Vienne river to alluvial deposits near the bottom. The Grézeaux is planted right in the middle on pure gravel and is by far my favorite wine here. These are the oldest vines at the domaine at 65 years and just about the purest expression of Cabernet Franc in the entire Loire Valley. The 2014 vintage got off to a rocky start with characteristically bad spring weather and up and down until August when things calmed down and nothing but perfect weather until harvest. These might be the best wines ever made at Baudry in fact. 


This isn't the green bell pepper tinged, high yielding Loire Cabernet Franc you might find in an ice bucket at many Paris bistros - I do have a soft spot for those actually when it was all I could afford to drink when traveling - but more of an explosion of dark red fruit and minerality right out of the bottle. Really a joy to drink young but will age beautifully and I think everyone ought to have at least a few of these in their cellar for the long term. Not much available as usual.

 

October 06, 2016

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Domaine Dupeuble Beaujolais

 

 

This is one of those wines you pass around your Sunday dinner table with friends, family, a roast chicken and the fear of embarrassment as you open the last of the six pack you purchased just as you’re clearing the table for cheese (the real drinking starts with the cheese as I’m sure you all know) and now you’re out of wine. Some bottles just go down that easy. 

The Domaine Dupeuble has been around for 500+ years as a continuously functioning winery. The name has changed a couple of times and the first Dupeuble to put their name on the shingle was Jules when he married the heiress to the property in 1919. Today, grandson Damien is in charge with his entire family involved in operations of this now 100 hectare property, 40% of it devoted to vines. Kermit Lynch, éminence grise of American importers, discovered these wines in the late 1980’s and a great relationship was forged. One that brought these wines to our shores for the first time.

The domaine is situated deep in the south of the Beaujolais AOC in the hamlet of Le Breuil. This is the southern half of Beaujolais, meaning everything south of the town of Villefranche-sur-Saone, and known for the light, fruity qualities of its wines. This is also the area known as the Bas Beaujolais, a terroir known for its flatter terrain and rich, sandstone and clay based soils. The majority of the Domaine Dupeuble is planted instead on granite soils with a bit of limestone, both types of rock the key to quality in the northern Beaujolais where the famous crus are located. This is what sets these wines apart. 

Being staunch advocates of sustainable farming, there is no use of chemical pesticides or synthetic fertilizers. Fruit is harvested manually, fermentation done on natural yeast, no sulfur, no chaptalization, no new oak, no filtration. Real, honest wine and it’s clear from the first sip. I’d compare this to a classic Chambolle-Musigny but at $14.99 I think I’d sound a bit cheeky. So I won’t. In any event, this is the best red wine I’ve ever offered at this price point and it happens to be in decent supply so I’ll also refrain from badgering you to stock up (but you really should get your hands on some).

 

 

September 29, 2016

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Francois Pinon Vouvray Silex Noir 2014: classic chenin blanc from it's best terroir



 
 

François Pinon isn’t a name you often hear mentioned in the same breath as Domaines Huet and Foreau but when you do, it’s often in the context of how Pinon’s wines are not only better but priced lower. The pricing issues have more to do with importer inflation (all three of these producers standard cuvées are virtually the same price in France for instance) but the quality and especially the style are something else. Pinon, in my mind anyway, is making a much more pure expression of Vouvray than the other two and the finest wine in the appellation. This is chenin blanc at it’s best.

François, a former child psychologist, took over the domaine from his father some 30 years ago now and has really made a name for himself and the domaine. It doesn’t hurt that the vineyards are planted on some of the regions best soils, black flint and limestone in particular at Pinon, but his farming and winemaking is just a lot better than most everyone else. François is manic about plowing which is great for healthy soil but very hard work. He started converting to organic viticulture 15 years ago or so which is no easy way to farm in the Loire Valley. The humid weather and frequent hailstorms force many larger growers to rely on chemical anti fungal treatments in these conditions and accomplishing this naturally is really difficult but necessary for making great wine. Winemaking is meticulous and fairly non-interventionist with the use of native yeasts and neutral fermentation and aging vessels, stainless steel and old foudres here

The Cuvée Silex Noir, in reference to the black flint soil, is the flagship Vouvray produced by Pinon. This bottling really shows off the house style which is bright, expressive chenin of great depth and precision. You often see Vouvray labelled as Sec and Demi-Sec to indicate the residual sugar in the wine but when you don’t see any designation, it usually means it’s Sec Tendre, or “tenderly dry”. This is a bottling with a bit of residual sugar but when made well, the result is a very dry wine with high acid to balance the sweetness. The Silex Noir is a fantastic example of this style. Peculiarly, Sec Tendre is a designation that isn't allowed to appear on a bottle and Vouvray Sec isn’t necessarily dry. Go figure. In any event, this wine is almost startlingly dry to the palate with high acid, low (12%) alcohol and gorgeous fruit. 2014 is the best vintage in many years for the Loire Valley and it really shows in this wine. Floral, mineral and white fruit notes dominate the nose. Flavors of pear and lemon/lime fruit with a long, mineral inflected finish. These wines are capable of long aging but so enticing as a summer wine.

May 03, 2015

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Montesecondo: Traditional Sangiovese From one of its Finest Sources

Silvio Messana at Montesecondo

 
 

Montesecondo Chianti Classico 2012 

The Montesecondo estate isn’t a very old operation by Tuscan standards. In a region where every winery seems to exude medieval history complete with ancient castles and abbeys, Montesecondo is practically brand new. Silvio Messana and wife Catalina relocated to this northern corner of the Chianti Classico zone from New York in 1999. The estate was created by Silvio’s parents who purchased the land in Cerbaia, just outside Florence in the Val di Pesa, in 1963 where they lived and sold fruit to a local negociant. Silvio was selling wine in New York City and made the decision in 1999 to move his family closer to his aging mother and stayed on after her death, converting the farm to their new home and seasonal B&B. Silvio also immediately decided to start tending the vines, build a cellar and make wine. 

After a year working the vines conventionally, Silvio knew there had to be a better way and after attending a seminar with Nicolas Joly, the godfather of the biodynamic movement, he came home, threw out the chemicals and started converting the vineyard to biodynamics. He also farms for very low yields; 30 hectoliters per hectare which is about half of that of most good Chianti producers and well below the regulated standards of even the best grand cru Burgundy sites. This allows the Sangiovese to fully express its structure and regal aromatic profile. The addition of small amounts of Colorino and Canaiolo revive the classic recipe for great Chianti. The former for, well, color and the latter to soften Sangiovese’s often considerable tannins in much the same role that Merlot plays to Cabernet Sauvignon in Bordeaux. 

Winemaking is meticulous here starting with a manual harvest, native yeasts and long fermentation in stainless steel vats. The wines are then transferred to old, well maintained 500 litre barrels where they spend a year mellowing and integrating. 

This is real Chianti Classico, not the international styled wine Tuscany has become famous, and sometimes infamous for (enlightening string of articles from my friend Jeremy Parzen on his excellent blog http://dobianchi.com/tag/brunellogate/) This means pleasantly chalky tannins, bright acidity and  beguiling aromas of sour cherry, almonds, well worn baseball glove leather, balsam and earth. An hommage to the style of wine that made Chianti the source of one of Italy’s noblest red wines.

 
April 22, 2015

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Antica Casa Vinicola Scarpa

One of the very oldest and greatest classic old estates of Piedmont, Scarpa has been growing and producing wine since 1854, years before the first bottles of Barolo and Barbaresco even carried those appellations. The cantina and vineyards are situated in Nizza Monferrato, squarely in the middle of Astigiano wine country. Though not located in Barolo and Barbaresco, they’re permitted to make those wines outside the respective zones since they’ve been doing it for so long. The winery was founded by Antonio Scarpa, a Venetian, and had been sold a couple of times throughout the years, finally being bought by Mario Pesce in the 1960’s. Mario was one of the first locals here to travel and work in France, mainly Burgundy and Alsace, where he gained a new perspective on natural farming and winemaking techniques. Marrying this innovation with tradition earned him the respect of locals like Bruno Giacosa and Bartolo Mascarello.The winery was sold to Maria Piera Zola, current director, and her family in 1971. The Zola family had a longstanding relationship with Mario Pesce and he entrusted them with his legacy. 

 

Scarpa is one of those names I’ve only ever seen on wine lists in ancient restaurants and wine shops between Asti and the Langhe along with the occasional aged cellar offer from great old Italian sources like Chamber St. in NYC. I’ve had a number of excellent aged bottles of Barbaresco and Barolo from this house in Piedmont over the years, mainly in classic old school restaurants like Cesare and Felicin. Those wines are just now starting to appear here through their new US importer and I was pleasantly surprised to see a lineup of these show up unannounced at a small tasting we did here in LA a few weeks ago. What really wowed me at the tasting though, besides the Barolo and Barbaresco, were the two wines in this offer. I’m a huge fan of very traditional Piemontese wines meaning long fermented, long aged wines of brickish color, gorgeous perfume and unapologetic structure. These sorts of wines are rarer than many might suspect on the US market and here are two perfect examples.

 
March 20, 2014

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Domaine Dupeuble Beaujolais 2012

 

Domaine Dupeuble Beaujolais 2012

$14.99


 

 

This is one of those wines you pass around your Sunday dinner table with friends, family, a roast chicken and the fear of embarrassment as you open the last of the six pack you purchased just as you’re clearing the table for cheese (the real drinking starts with the cheese as I’m sure you all know) and now you’re out of wine. Some bottles just go down that easy. 

 

The Domaine Dupeuble has been around for 500+ years as a continuously functioning winery. The name has changed a couple of times and the first Dupeuble to put their name on the shingle was Jules when he married the heiress to the property in 1919. Today, grandson Damien is in charge with his entire family involved in operations of this now 100 hectare property, 40% of it devoted to vines. Kermit Lynch, éminence grise of American importers, discovered these wines in the late 1980’s and a great relationship was forged. One that brought these wines to our shores for the first time.

 

The domaine is situated deep in the south of the Beaujolais AOC in the hamlet of Le Breuil. This is the southern half of Beaujolais, meaning everything south of the town of Villefranche-sur-Saone, and known for the light, fruity qualities of its wines. This is also the area known as the Bas Beaujolais, a terroir known for its flatter terrain and rich, sandstone and clay based soils. The majority of the Domaine Dupeuble is planted instead on granite soils with a bit of limestone, both types of rock the key to quality in the northern Beaujolais where the famous crus are located. This is what sets these wines apart. 

 

Being staunch advocates of sustainable farming, there is no use of chemical pesticides or synthetic fertilizers. Fruit is harvested manually, fermentation done on natural yeast, no sulfur, no chaptalization, no new oak, no filtration. Real, honest wine and it’s clear from the first sip.

 

The 2012 vintage was a tough one as you may have already heard, especially if you read these emails, but conscientious producers like Dupeuble were able to take advantage of the fact that the fruit they did harvest was of superlative quality. It just took an extraordinary level of attention to detail. 

 

The 2012 Dupeuble Beaujolais from first nose performs way beyond its humble pedigree. A beautiful bouquet of cherries, cranberry, smoke and violet is anything but subtle. Pure and sappy mid-palate, medium bodied and fantastic balance, just a touch of the tannin of the vintage, excellent length and grip. And all of 12.5% alcohol according to the label. After consuming a bottle or two, I’d say it’s actually just a bit lower than that. I’d also compare this to a classic Chambolle-Musigny but at $14.99 I think I’d sound a bit cheeky. So I won’t. In any event, this is the best red wine I’ve ever offered at this price point and it happens to be in decent supply so I’ll also refrain from badgering you to stock up (but you really should get your hands on some).

 

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

$14.99

in stock 
buy here
 
 


Free delivery in Los Angeles and Orange Counties on 3 bottles or more



 

 
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steve@enofinewine.com
March 12, 2014

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Baudry Chinon La Croix Boissée 2011: Best of Breed Chinon from a Master

There's not much more one can say about press darling Domaine Baudry, and its reference standard Chinons, that hasn't already been written. For my part, easily the best producer in Chinon and, along with Clos Rougeard, the best source of Cabernet Franc in the Loire Valley. Starting with just a couple of hectares of vines in the 1970's from family holdings, Bernard Baudry has grown the domaine to its current size of 25 hectares. 


Soil types in the Loire Valley have everything to with the Loire itself with vineyard sites close to the river being alluvial in origin meaning gravel and some silica and hillsides being mainly clay; the former typically producing lighter, more elegant wines and the hillsides more substantial examples. The very best terroirs tend to be the tops of the hills where pure, chalky limestone is found close to or at the surface with shallow clay topsoil. This is the source of the Croix Boissée, Baudry's rarest and best cuvée. 

The Croix Boissée, one of five distinctly different Cabernet Francs produced here, comes from a 2.5 hectare parcel with a full south exposition. Farming is organic, yields are very low and élevage is done in old wood, 18 months in this case. The structured nature of this cuvée requires extended barrel aging and the result is a pure, structured and complex wine.

The 2011 vintage in the Loire wasn't an ideal one. A promising, dry and warm spring gave way to a cold, damp summer. Vineyards near the river needed lots of tlc with the threat of rot a constant issue. Most growers harvested by mid-September, just as the weather was turning warm and sunny, before rot could really set in. Hilltop parcels like the Croix Boissée have  the advantage of good drainage  and ventilation and were able to take advantage of a couple of extra weeks of warm, dry weather. The result is a classic Chinon of the highest order.

The 2011 La Croix Boissée is a stunner. Reminscent of the 2005, the 2011 reveals the warmth of the harvest with lush fruit and gorgeous aromatics. Classic Cab Franc structure holds it all together. Deep purple color. Pretty notes of flowers, tobacco and minerals on the nose with mineral-charged black and blue fruit flavors. One of the few remaining wines you can buy anywhere near this good for the price.  


 

 

 
 

 

  

 

$33.99

30 bottles in stock 
buy here
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